Ledgers Tonics and The Gin Lab

Recently I received an email from The Gin Lab asking me to write a review on Ledgers Tonics. I’m always keen to try something new and especially spend a bit more time looking at tonics as that part of the industry is really taking off at the moment. They kindly sent me out the three new tonics, flavoured with cinnamon, liquorice and tangerine to try out.


The Ledgers story is an interesting one and the full story can be found at ledgerstonic.com. It begins in 1862 when Charles Ledger travelled into the forests of Peru in search of quinine from Cinchona Trees. At the time this was the traditional ingredient used by the Incas to heal malaria. He went on to discover a more powerful quinine that still carries his namesake.

The Cinchona Trees were being cut down without being replaced so export was banned with threat of the death penalty. Despite this Ledger collected them and had them sent to London and across Europe, India and Australia.

Nowadays many of the trees growing in India and Java have come from the collected seeds and the variety that he discovered is still though of as the best quinine in the world.DSC_0011

The tonic flavours are very unusual. I began with the licorice. The idea behind this is to stimulate the sense of smell, allowing you to enjoy more of the aroma for your drink. The tonic is well balanced, soft and sweet and having done some research it seems that licorice can actually be rather good for the love life too. Feel free to look that up.

Next up was the tangerine. The aroma of tangerine is strong and it’s a little more subtle on the palette. The lightly flavoured fruit would complement a lot of sweet and citrus gins. I like the tangerine. I found the flavour a little softer than the others but tangerine is a gentle flavour and a more hushed addition than orange or lemon which can sometimes be a little overpowering. This would be very good with delicate gins.

Finally the cinnamon tonic. There’s a nice hit of sweet spice, but still very gentle in the tonic itself The idea behind this is that cinnamon stimulates gastric acids. Apparently it’s very good for you on it’s own and can help relieve stomach cramps and heartburn and there are even some cases of it lowering blood sugar. There’s a lot of power in that spice!

All in all Ledgers are a very unusual range of tonic with a lot of history behind them. I would love to organise an evening trying these in lots of different gins and I can appreciate the extra scope on flavour to gins that they offer. Since Fever Tree notably upped the tonic game there are more contemporary tonics coming out with very inventive and fruity flavours. What I particularly like about the Ledgers tonics is that they are subtle. The hint of flavour is enough to keep a gin and tonic light and fresh, and the options are unusual opening a wider spectrum of flavours to offer gins. They are a very well balanced offering indeed.


The Gin Lab run a mobile gin bar, offer support and customer service to trade (including helping design a G&T menu) and are also able to organise gin and tonic events. Ledgers gin is their newest offering and due for imminent release. For more information you can head to their site here.

A fantastical history of gin

Have you ever heard of the term dutch courage? Well a little birdy suggests it comes from gin.

Gin, or genever in its original form, was being used for medicinal purposes in 17th century Holland. Being a rather nasty tasting alcohol, it was flavoured by a small berry called Juniper (all important to classify a drink as gin). Troops fighting in the war 30 years war were sipping it from small bottles on their belts and sozzled, were fearlessly running into battle, hence the term ‘dutch courage’ was born. Our troops picked up on this and before long were bringing it home, where it was being distilled and sold in chemists shops. For a time it was only the ‘worshipful company of distillers’ that had the right to distill in the 21 miles surrounding London.

This was to change with the return of William lll from Holland in 1698. He dropped the tax on gin and deregulated it. If a public notice was put up and left for 10 days, anyone could produce gin from home grown corn. This led to one very drunk London! 1 in 4 households were producing very low quality gin in their bathtubs and 7000 spirit shops sprung up. With gin being a safer alternative for the poor than disease ridden water, it was thought that the average adult would consume 65 litres of gin a year. This led to to the decline of society and dark times for morality. There lot’s of truly terrible stories from this era.

Thousands were dying from gin consumption and something had to be done. The government tried introducing the Gin Act on 29th September 1736 with a £50 license fee. People were up in arms and riots quickly broke out of London. Over 11 million gallons were still being produced and only 2 licenses had been sold. This prohibition led to the creation of ‘old tom’ gin. This gin, with deep, sweet tasting liquorice was sold illegally wherever a black cat was on display. Alternatively, your drink could be procured by putting a penny into the cat, so a shot would come out of the paw. Arguably this is one of the first vending machines and was testament to the hold gin had over the masses.

The act was recalled in 1742 and a new policy was drawn up with influences from the distillers, that formed a similar model to what we work to now. Production became more respectable and higher quality gins were being produced by emerging manufacturers such as Gordons and Tanqueray. The invention of the column still in the 1830s also led to the creation of London Dry Gin, one of the highest qualities of gin production.

Beer shops and gin shops were the original public houses, somewhere you could feel as comfortable as home whilst enjoying a drink. The decor relied on the clientele and with gin’s biggest supporter’s being the lower classes, most of these were slums. However, with the increase in quality of spirit, gin palaces began popping up to serve the higher society and there were over 5000 of these by the 1850s. Attitudes were changing though and with the temperance movement mid 1830s over time things became a little more balanced.

There were no new distilleries in London from 1820-2009. The founders of Sipsmiths had a desperate passion to make gin and embarked on a 2 year process to change the law. They opened the new distillery on 14th May and with this the opportunity for for small batch production for artisan distillers. With adventurous mixes of botanicals and a watchful eye over quality we are currently in the throws of a revolution and I, for one, am very happy to be here in this part of it’s rich history.

I’m sure it goes without saying, there is so much more to the story than this. I’ll be sure to be posting snippets of history here and there to add to this rather colourful tapestry.