TBGC 10 Gin Example Extraordinaire – Part 1

That Boutique-y Gin Company are doing rather well for themselves.

I’ve got 4 bottles of various gins here and I’m trying to write a focused article on each one. (Lot’s to look forward to at Ginfluence HQ). The same day I start this little project, I get a parcel from TBGC with 10 samples of recent additions to their family of fantastic tinctures. I feel delightfully spoilt. I’ll cover 5 today, 5 next week, only to draw out the pleasure, dear reader.

They’ve got so much to offer! Working with existing distilleries and gins to create inventive spin offs and also their own one off gins.

So lets get started. It’s the quick fire round!

neroli-gin-that-boutiquey-gin-company-ginNeroli Gin, 46% : A rather special gin for the lovers of floral flavours, it uses Neroli oil which is extracted from the blossom of bitter orange trees. That bitterness is evened out beautifully by the addition of spicy juniper. Apparently it takes a tonne of flowers to make 1 kg of oil, and with the first batch at only 718 bottles, this is a pretty precious gin. With an opening heavy with floral, sweet spicy citrus palate and lingering finish. It’s going to be fantastic for cocktails and summer coolers.


Pan-Pacific Gin, Farallon Gin, 46%: An American Dry Gin, the idea being to contain botanicals from each side of the pacific. The signature botanicals in the instance are yuzu and schisandra berries. There’s a sweetness to this gin, vanilla kind of flavour that gives it the feel of an old tom. This is twisted nicely with spice and the warmth of juniper. This one is relatively simple in flavours on the palette, and worth owning because of the idea itself. For fans of TBGC 7 Continents Gin.


Cucamelon Gin, 46%: Well, here was me thinking that this gin would be a blend of cucumber and melon botanicals but as it stands, the cucamelon is its own thing, a fruit that looks like a small watermelon but tastes like cucumber with a slightly limey element. Soft and sweet in flavour, with a well balanced kick of juniper on the nose, lime pudding richness. The lime flavour does have a surprising kick. I’ll be sure to experiment with this in long, gin coolers when the summer returns.


CitroLondon Dry Gin, Fifty Eight Gin, 45%: A London Dry Gin, this has a fantastic story! So, the Fifty Eight Distillery has worked with author of 101 Gin To Try Before You Die, Ian Buxton, to create this lovely little nod to London’s distilling history. There is an unusual and ancient little citrus that’s been growing in London for eons, so what a fantastic idea to use that citrus to create a London Dry. Fantastic idea and fantastic gin. Massive citrus flavours that become more spicy as the flavour develops. Citrus gins are growing in popularity with fresh flavours. This one is a cracker.

chocolate-cherry-gin-mcqueen-that-boutiquey-gin-company-ginChocolate Cherry Gin, Mqueen, 42%: A marvellous creation, with sour cherry and cocoa. There is a delightful desert element, with notes of forest gateaux and kirsch soaked cherry. Although it seems like a particular flavour, and maybe not so adaptable, there’s a lot you can do with this gin. It’s not only good for sipping, it would also work wonderfully with cooking and my favourite is slipping it into a hot chocolate for an ultimate toe curling comforter and deeply sweet nights sleep. Perfect to see us through the next few cold months. I’ll take 2 please.

I normally put links to the relevant sites, but we know who they are, don’t we? Master of MaltAmazon, as well as local suppliers. But full details can be found at the ‘where to buy’ section on TBGC’s website.

I’m feeling pretty good after getting stuck into these 5 special gins. Do tune in next week where I’ll be covering the others: Double Sloe Gin, Whittakers, Hot Sauce Gin, Finger Lime Gin, Strawberry and Balsamic Gin and the absolutely stunning Rhubarb Triangle gin, which seems to tickle every available rhubarb sensor in the mouth. Well done TBGC! Keep up the good work, and do please keep sending them my way!



Festivities in our fair city – The Gin Festival comes to Portsmouth

One of the things that baffles me about our hometown of Portsmouth, is that despite our Victorian and nautical heritage, there is a distinct lack of gin in our history.

Am I missing a trick here?

I’m wondering if it simply wasn’t documented. It’s a subject I am highly interested in and dedicated to uncovering. If anyone out there has any stories or information, please do get in contact. It would satisfy my restless heart and I’d love to write about it.

Nonetheless, every day is history in the making and look at us now, in the midst of this gin revolution. The number of distilleries in Britain has doubled in only 6 years according to a recent article in the Telegraph and let’s be honest, with the huge array of flavours achievable through natures glorious palette of botanicals, there is room for everyone. Along with distilleries, gin bars and gin evenings have been popping up like straws out of fizz since the law was changed in 2009 and there’s a world of gin out there for the discerning drinker. Even JD Wetherspoons have managed to bag some very good brands for their ‘gin palace’ selection, including craft gin revolution forefathers, Sipsmiths themselves.

So, what to do as a beginner. Well, we can research online. Or more fun we could venture into a local gin bar for recommendations and explanations of flavour. We now have another option. The Gin Festival, an opportunity to learn together, stopping on its national tour in the Guildhall of our beautiful city.

Lock your doors. The gin fiends are out in force and tonight I walk amongst them.

The queue was full anticipation and the well dressed and it moved quickly. Once inside we had an introduction from Laura, and provided with very own copa glass, gin book, pen and order form, we were ready to be let loose. There were four areas as such, the main arena with live music and the gin stalls: A&B: British, C: International and D: fruit/sloes/liquors, the cocktail bar with vendor sample stalls, the masterclasses and an outside space with food and a punch bar.

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Tooled up

The people were plentiful and our immersion into this collection of chic, geeky and fun loving drinkers was quick and natural. The gin books with introduction, recommended Fever-Tree tonic and garnish for each and every gin proved incredibly effective for those still learning and took the weight off the staff if they didn’t know an answer about a particular one of the good 100 gins on offer. It was however, very impressive what they did know and there was a definite passion, pride and patience in explanation that made learning a more fun and comfortable experience. It was also obvious that they were enjoying themselves too and the bubbling correspondence between them and the drinkers made for a tantalising and somewhat boisterous atmosphere.

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My advice is, that it’s imperative to try a sip before the adding tonic. By adding tonic you are creating a completely different drink, garnish an additional element entirely. Some gins are made to be sipped on their own, some are made to be opened up by the right tonic pairing. To get a true understanding of the complexity of flavours in a gin it’s important to try it both ways. Terribly hard work, that.

With so many to choose from it made it difficult to choose at all. We started with Bluebottle, a gin that made an appearance as part of the Craft Gin Club on Dragons Den and has also won both a gold award in the San Francisco World Spirits Competition and the Gin Masters 2016. Not a bad set of credentials and with such a beautiful and powerful taste including notes of floral and spice it delivers what it promises.

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As we enjoyed our first of many, we took time to contemplate the offerings in the Gin Book and our next selection was a no brainer for me. Dictador Columbian Ortodoxy Premium Aged Gin, a Columbian twist on our favourite tipple. The sugar cane spirit base and ageing in rum barrels gave a deliciously sweet underbelly to its more tart juniper and citrus elements.

It was shortly after this, and still with two gins left, I started to contemplate the possibility of buying more tokens. I then started considering how much I would have to spend to try every gin I wanted, finally reassuring myself that although that wasn’t possible, the Dictador had already been a brilliant discovery and had made my night worthwhile. This voyage of discovery is the very magic at the heart of the Gin Festival.

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It was about time to check out the cocktail bar. With a lovely little collection of gin themed cocktails such as the Rhubarb Rumble with proceeds going to charity, there was something for everyone. I spoke to a seasoned chap who had clearly found his place and had decided the Rumble was his favourite thing ever. His joy was infectious and he wasn’t the only one. Two hours in everyone was beaming brightly in their gin tinted glasses.

The vendor stalls were fantastic. I just love the opportunity to meet distillers and representatives to talk to them about their gin in detail. I firmly believe that understanding the story behind the gin gives the flavour an extra depth that’s simply unachievable by taste alone. I counted Locksley, Masons, Whitley Neil, Copper House, Conker, Pinkster and Brockmans, who together were a brilliant collection with lots of variety between them.

Sir Robin of Locksley Gin was a delight. Elderflower and Dandelion with pink grapefruit that gives it a wonderful sweetness. In addition, elderflower tonic lights it up into a fresh and dewy spring day of a drink. This was one of my favourites and recommendations of the evening.

Brockmans have been on my list for a while and they didn’t disappoint. The blueberry and blackberry tones came alive and fizzled like sparklers with ginger ale. Absolutely made for the Autumn months to warm our hearts when creeping chills hint of the coming winter and the crackles and smoke of bonfires fill the air.

It was lovely to meet a couple of the guys from Conker. Living in Bournemouth for a while, I’d heard of them bringing out the first Dorset gin for over 100 years and I’d been, as once a local, rooting for them to do well. They certainly have with a combination of earthy compounds including elderberries, samphire and gorse which they forage regularly in their local area, a delightful pastime if it weren’t for the prickliness of the bushes.

It was good to see Masons there too. I’m already a fan of their tea gin (marvellous in a marmalade Martini) and was lucky enough to try their lavender gin which was stunning. Not the heavy floral taste we’d expect, but soft, gentle and sweet. It’s on my Christmas list, which was by that point, growing longer by the minute.

The food smelt incredible and on venturing outside we found two stalls and the punch bar. A nice chat with host Peter revealed we had just missed the last of his special punch, an unusual milk and citrus marvel that he based upon a recipe that was over a century old. I would love to go into more detail on this, and fingers crossed that may happen down the line, so watch this space.

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Back to the main arena and the music was flowing. Speakeasy style fiddle and guitar from two very talented musicians really got the mood going. I went in for a Strathearn Oaked Highland Gin, on the rocks as recommended by the rather knowledgeable barman. The website recommends serving with an equal measure of orange juice for a brunch drink, the Gin Harvey Wallbanger. I’m doing that as soon as possible. Life has many heavens to me and one of them is sipping on a whisky gin.

And another would be Tarquin’s Single Estate Cornish Tea Gin Ltd Edition. This absolutely outstanding gin has been made exclusively for the festival. With Tregothan tea Camellia sinensis, kaffir lime, ginger and bee pollen it is both a delicacy and a triumph. Floral notes, warmth and the most wonderful sweetness that lingers on the tongue. I am heartbroken at its passing and live in hope they release a public batch. If you like the sound of this, it’s worth checking out South Western Distillery, they are creating some wonderful things at the moment.

I confess, through the fun I was having what with talking to all the lovely people about gin, drinking said gin, furiously writing notes and having the occasional dance time just raced past and I missed the masterclasses. I did however catch up with the lovely gentleman from Locksley Distilleries who explained that during his masterclass (120-140 people in attendance), he had spoken a little about EU regulation and explained that they were about lots of different aspects of gin and between them they’d tried to cover lots of these.

I wish I could have stayed longer, the time ran out far too quickly but that’s always a good sign. All the extras like Hobo Tom Photography really kept the party moving. Tom is the official photographer for the Gin Festival and you can see his work in much of their marketing. He took some amazing photos taken there, and some a bit of fun, one of my good friend Dave and me is posted below. Before we knew it, we were spilling out into the streets of Portsmouth, clinging defensively to our copa glasses and chattering excitedly about all our favourite findings. It seems that everyone was in agreement that it was a big step up from last year. The Gin Festival began in 2012 when Jym and Marie Harris wanted to up the ante on the gin bars they’d visited and that idea has grown and grown. Four years down the line and business is booming. This year there are 28 locations around the UK. Next year it’s looking to be 40.

Dave and I doing what we do best.

Since I first discovered the gin revolution it has blossomed into a renaissance, with Artisan distillers putting love, money and pride into creating truly beautiful gins. It’s an interest for adults to indulge and socialise in, sharing knowledge, enthusiasm and a bit of good old fashioned fun. Despite Portsmouth’s lacking history in gin, we are gaining momentum for the future. What with establishments such as Gin and Olive offering very good selections, local distilleries like the Isle Of Wight offering mighty gins such as Mermaids and the Might HMS Victory Navy Strength Gin and now the Gin Festival, maybe it’s Portsmouth’s time to shine and to take on the gin torch that it’s deserved for so many years. Who’s with me? Raise your glasses! Chin chin!

Many thanks to Laura at the Gin Festival for the press passes.

Also huge thanks to my good friend David Scotland for the photography. If you like his style you can find out more about him here and look at and purchase his work from here.

Make a suggestion – The gin list

Further to my previous blog Tell me, what’s your flavour?, my good friend Lewys Pharoah at Gin and Olive has spent a great deal of time going through the our gins and has compiled a list of gins in their flavour brackets. He’s separated sloe gins and extra strength but kept the liqueurs in their relevant flavour category. There is also one red herring non-gin in the list. Can you spot it?

Now it’s safe to say with the ever changing gin world there’ll be changes made. Of course new gins will be added and over hazy late night debate some categories could be changed. Still, I think it only fair to keep all gins on the list, even when out of production. This a brilliant reference for anyone starting down the gin road and in time could prove a very fruitful document.

Any suggestions, please get in touch!

Cream gin
Haymans Old Tom
Tanqueray Old Tom
Gabriel Boudier Saffron
Warner Edwards Rhubarb
Spencerfield Raspberry – liqueur

Deaths Door
Gin Mare
Martin Miller Original
Boys Genever
Twisted Nose

Cold River
Spencerfield Edinburgh
Monkey 47

Tanqueray Ten
No 209
Hammer & Son Old Pot (sweet)
Caorunn (floral)
Whitney Neill
Blackdown Sussex (dry)
Bombay Sapphire
Spencerfield Orange – liqueur

The Botanist
William Chase
Square One Botanical
Fords 86
London No.1 Blue
Bloom London
Beefeater 24
Spencerfield Elderflower – liqueur

Haymans London Dry
Tanqueray (import and export strength)
London Dry No.3
Moonshine Kid Dogs Nose
Fifty Pounds
Sipsmith London
Warner Edwards Harrington Dry
Geranium London
Portobello Road No.171
Plymouth Gin
Bombay Original

Juniper Driven
Sipsmith VJOP
Martin Miller Westbourne Strength

Extra Strength
Plymouth Navy Strength
Royal Dock

Haymans Sloe
Warner Edwards Harrington sloe
Sipsmith Sloe
William Chase Sloe

Tell me, what’s your flavour?

So, as I see it there are 8 main brackets of gin flavour (Do let me know if you think otherwise). To know and understand these is a good starting point as no matter how well made a gin is, it’s all still a matter of taste. The next step is to understand how each botanical tastes and smells (we’ll get into that another time). Sooner or later you can gauge what bracket a gin will fall into by looking at the listed botanicals.

A list of gins and their flavour brackets can be found in my post Make a suggestion – The gin list This list is sure to grow and if you have any comments – suggestions, I’d love to hear them.

I do love a good sweet gin. Old Tom gins are my particular favourite. With a nice hit of liquorice (and sometimes added sugar), the gin has a deep and naturally sweet undertone. Haymans were one of the gin makers to look at reviving this older forgotten recipe (a brief story of old tom is included in my fantastical history of gin). Many have followed suit including those big hitters Tanqueray. Their Old Tom gin is a limited edition (only 150,000 bottles have been produced). If you’re sweet enough then try mixing it with bitter lemon for a well balanced and unusual flavour (this also works fabulously with Cream gin created by the Worship Street Whistling Shop).

Savoury flavours are big at the moment and the gin on everyone’s lips has to be Gin Mare (pronounced Mar-ray). Served with basil and Fever Tree’s Mediterranean tonic water it makes for a crisp and refreshing G&T. The rosemary and lemongrass in the tonic sets the sweetness of the basil off nicely. Savoury flavours are bursting with herby botanicals and foodstuffs such as Olives. They also comfortably lend themselves towards other brackets so some fantastic balances can be achieved. Twisted Nose for example, is a wonderful, locally produced gin with peppery watercress and floral lavender.

Some like it hot. This is also true with gin. Some G&Ts can be served with a garnish of fresh chilli giving an extra kick to an already warming flavour. Great to take your summer drink right on through the autumn before we’re all drowning in a sea of hot toddies and mulled wine. Bathtub gin is a favourite of mine with hints of comforting clove and orange. Monkey 47 also certainly deserves a mention, with 6 different peppers and one of the longest lists of botanicals in a gin.

Gin needs citrus. It’s a fundamental part of most gins and most products use peel for their flavour. There are a handful that don’t, including the world renowned Tanqueray Ten. Tanqueray have also been pretty clever with the creation of Tanqueray Rangpur. Based on an old tradition of using the rare rangpur limes to smooth down the flavour, it delivers a gorgeous hit of fruitiness when sipped on it’s own. There are others out there so if you like your drink a little tart these will be the ones to look into.

Floral gins are summer in a glass. Delicate and flavoursome they are a stark contrast to the enormity of the Juniper we can taste in standard gin recipes. That said, they are the perfect base for any elderflower cocktail. Bloom is well worth comment. With camomile and honeysuckle it delivers a superbly sweet and gentle flavour. The Botanist Islay is up there as one if my favourites. Created by a whisky distiller, there are at least 31 botanicals in its recipe and 22 are native and hand foraged. The result is a complex floral taste with deep hints of earthiness from the surrounding bog and its as if the drink itself is a homage to our earth.

This is what most gin drinkers expect and in fact, this is a underlying flavour in the huge majority of gins as Juniper does have a naturally dry taste. For those of us after something special, No 3 London Dry Gin delivers. Keeping the recipe simple with only 3 fruits and 3 spices used, it’s clean, crisp and everything you expect from gin. This drink stands for good quality and makes the valuable statement that excellence comes from simplicity, just as much as complexity.

Juniper Driven
One for the true gin drinker. Juniper is the original and definitive gin flavouring. Although we’ve had a recent explosion in flavour experimentation there are some drinkers that feel if you can’t fully taste the juniper, it’s not a real gin. A wonderful example is Sipsmiths VJOP (Very Junipery Overproof). At 57% – Navy rum strength, this stuff really packs a wallop. There are plenty of other gins that are juniper driven but still carry a notable background flavour.

There are a variety of tasty gin liqueurs to be tried. Being a liqueur the abv is much lower than the standard 40% and at around 20% they are lovely to sip over ice. Spencerfield Edinburgh gin have a fabulous range including a raspberry one that really tickles me in the right places. I’ve also found it works brilliantly as a replacement for desert wine.