Ledgers Tonics and The Gin Lab

Recently I received an email from The Gin Lab asking me to write a review on Ledgers Tonics. I’m always keen to try something new and especially spend a bit more time looking at tonics as that part of the industry is really taking off at the moment. They kindly sent me out the three new tonics, flavoured with cinnamon, liquorice and tangerine to try out.

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The Ledgers story is an interesting one and the full story can be found at ledgerstonic.com. It begins in 1862 when Charles Ledger travelled into the forests of Peru in search of quinine from Cinchona Trees. At the time this was the traditional ingredient used by the Incas to heal malaria. He went on to discover a more powerful quinine that still carries his namesake.

The Cinchona Trees were being cut down without being replaced so export was banned with threat of the death penalty. Despite this Ledger collected them and had them sent to London and across Europe, India and Australia.

Nowadays many of the trees growing in India and Java have come from the collected seeds and the variety that he discovered is still though of as the best quinine in the world.DSC_0011

The tonic flavours are very unusual. I began with the licorice. The idea behind this is to stimulate the sense of smell, allowing you to enjoy more of the aroma for your drink. The tonic is well balanced, soft and sweet and having done some research it seems that licorice can actually be rather good for the love life too. Feel free to look that up.

Next up was the tangerine. The aroma of tangerine is strong and it’s a little more subtle on the palette. The lightly flavoured fruit would complement a lot of sweet and citrus gins. I like the tangerine. I found the flavour a little softer than the others but tangerine is a gentle flavour and a more hushed addition than orange or lemon which can sometimes be a little overpowering. This would be very good with delicate gins.

Finally the cinnamon tonic. There’s a nice hit of sweet spice, but still very gentle in the tonic itself The idea behind this is that cinnamon stimulates gastric acids. Apparently it’s very good for you on it’s own and can help relieve stomach cramps and heartburn and there are even some cases of it lowering blood sugar. There’s a lot of power in that spice!

All in all Ledgers are a very unusual range of tonic with a lot of history behind them. I would love to organise an evening trying these in lots of different gins and I can appreciate the extra scope on flavour to gins that they offer. Since Fever Tree notably upped the tonic game there are more contemporary tonics coming out with very inventive and fruity flavours. What I particularly like about the Ledgers tonics is that they are subtle. The hint of flavour is enough to keep a gin and tonic light and fresh, and the options are unusual opening a wider spectrum of flavours to offer gins. They are a very well balanced offering indeed.

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The Gin Lab run a mobile gin bar, offer support and customer service to trade (including helping design a G&T menu) and are also able to organise gin and tonic events. Ledgers gin is their newest offering and due for imminent release. For more information you can head to their site here.

Gin 101 – Production

Let’s start with the basics. What is gin? How is it made? Gin starts life as a vodka. The definition of vodka is a spirit distilled to 96% or more alcohol by volume (abv). Also known as a neutral alcohol and the best has no taste at all. There are many possible base materials but most often used are grain, potatoes or molasses. This vodka must be then flavoured with the distinct, ‘piney’ essence of juniper to become a gin. A fine gin should contain at least 6-10 botanicals. Most often used are corriander, angelica root, citrus peel, cinnamon (or cassis- a commonly used variant), though in today’s Artisan world there is a huge spectrum of different botanicals allowing ever growing combinations of different flavours.

Once the distillation process is completed the liquid is then diluted with water to bring it down to desired abv. The minimum is 37.5%, although the strength needs to be higher (around 40%) to be considered premium and most prefer to drink around 42%. Navy strength runs at 57% (a whole story in itself). A higher alcohol level means a higher quality and therefore comes with a higher price tag due to the higher duty cost. There are 3 main types of gin:

Compound gin

This is a basic gin and is not redistilled. It has the botanicals and flavourings infused or mixed in. It’s labelled simply as gin and won’t be of the best quality as the distiller doesn’t have to worry about getting it right first time and can easily mask any unpleasantness with additives.

Distilled gin

Distilled gin is made from a neutral spirit (vodka) which is then infused with juniper berries and botanicals and redistilled. Alcohol and flavourings may be added after distillation and the end product may be coloured or sweetened. This means that small tweaks can be made but the original distillation needs to be good enough.

London Dry Gin

London Dry Gin is redistilled with juniper berries and botanicals. The flavourings may be added only during distillation and must be natural. The ethyl alcohol must be of high quality and the gin must contain at least 70% alcohol after distillation. No colouring can be added but sugar can be. This means the distiller has to get the flavour right first time, so this is classed as one of the highest qualities of gin production. London Dry Gin refers to the process only, therefore it doesnt need to be made in London and although preferred, it won’t necessarily taste like the heavy juniper taste we associate with London Dry. Additionally to juniper it can also include a wealth of different botanicals.